Purpose of Art

Recently, for school, I was working on a paper that concentrated on the uses of propaganda for the rise of and during Nazi’s control of Germany. Within my paper, I made the connection that art can influence. There is a reason that Fascist Italy, Communist Russia, Nazi Germany, and so many other corrupt and non-corrupt political ideas and rulers have used art. It’s because it has power.

Art can used to explore many areas: politics, spiritual, physiological, philosophical, psychological, literature, science, religious, and more. Each art movement provides the world different ideas, views, and art. For instance, Greek and Roman art brought us ideal proportions in buildings and body structures; the Renaissance brought us perspective, humanism, refinement, oil painting, significant renewal in Greek and Roman art, scholarship, etc; the Modern era brought us new ways to create themes and subjects that have been around for many years. Plus, each art movement and era brought new discoveries and explorations. As Charlotte Jirousek states, “Each work is an expression of the subject in the context of the values, culture, and events of its specific era.”

An article I found online, called “Art,” says that: “An instrument exists for something beyond itself – namely, for what it can be used to do … Even though art can sometimes be instrumental, that fact is not essential to its nature. What art is “good for” arises from its being an end in itself, or more accurately, the embodiment of many different things that are valuable for their own sakes …

Art is one major form of response to the world. It is often an attempt to capture an aspect of the world, to draw attention to something about it, to comment on it, to present a surprising or fresh angle on it, to represent it for the sake of exploring something about it, or enjoying or celebrating it – for example, the colours or shapes of an object, its eccentricity or typicality, the interest or repugnance it provokes.”


Feature Image from editimage.club

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